•  
WHEN THE LANDSCAPE LISTENS
WITH
Adrianna Glaviano, Carlo e Fabio Ingrassia, Paula Karoline Kamps, John Kleckner
DATE
opening 26th June | 27th June to 2nd August 2015
PLACE
Palermo
MUSEUM
Cappella dell'Incoronazione, Exhibition space of Riso Museo d'Arte Contemporanea della Sicilia
PHOTO CREDITS
Fausto Brigantino
WITH
Adrianna Glaviano, Carlo e Fabio Ingrassia, Paula Karoline Kamps, John Kleckner
DATE
opening 26th June | 27th June to 2nd August 2015
PLACE
Palermo
MUSEUM
Cappella dell'Incoronazione, Exhibition space of Riso Museo d'Arte Contemporanea della Sicilia
PHOTO CREDITS
Fausto Brigantino

A Certain Slant of Light by Valentina Bruschi

The Viaggio in Sicilia took place during the grape harvest of 2014, just as autumn was beginning, when the sunlight is mellow and the fields are being ploughed. Emily Dickinson’s poem, from which this text gets its title, as does the exhibition When the Landscape Listens, speaks of a mysterious light that makes reality different from how it is normally perceived. The poet speaks of a “heavenly hurt” that generates a profound inner change, felt by nomadic poets and artists as they seek inspiration. In Sicily, it is still possible to have a direct experience of territories steeped in memories and nature, traditions and myths, places that recall ancient rituals brimming with symbols. It is a culture that harbours values linked to history and to the land. Today it has finally been brought back to the attention of all those who are hard at work to restore its central role thanks to a return to an appreciation of a sustainable relationship between Man and Nature. Viticulture in Sicily, which is addressed to the preservation and safeguarding of the rural landscape, to the eco-compatibility of what it produces, as well as to the valorization of the natural resources, has been one of the driving forces behind this socio-economic-cultural project. For all the artists involved, this experience of travelling across Sicily meant visiting the different places on the island, but it also meant an infiltration of diversity, which is reflected in art’s capacity to capture situations and create multiple and diverse visions. In the exhibition, organized and held nine months after the nomadic residency – during which a small community was created where the different personalities could relate to one another and to the surrounding reality –, the artists transported the experience of their journey into their new works. Adrianna Glaviano and Ignazio Mortellaro carried out a photographic reportage both on film and digital media, for which Adrianna also used a vintage Polaroid Land 195 to create the Visual Diary for this publication. In her snapshots, Adrianna Glaviano captures the same fascination that the Polaroid camera generated at the time of its invention: an image so small that it can be held in one’s hand and carried along during a journey, an image in which to watch the forms slowly develop on its surface – an image that is inevitably destined to fade in time. Details, at times negligible, become significant, and our eyes might never have captured the beauty therein, whilst it is enhanced by the photographer. These soft-hued images become poetic due to the aura of splendour that they convey. Fragile subjects like dried flowers are capable of catalyzing light and space. Paula Karoline Kamps made large-format paintings in which the memories of the journey are transfigured into dream-like images poised between abstraction and figuration: the pattern of a Baroque floor; a floating body illuminated by multiple moons (which create a visual distortion of the planes); a man’s arm covered in tattoos in which the lighter colours on the skin seem to have faded with time. An intense blue dominates the background of two of the canvases made after the journey to Sicily, where sky and sea meet as one and give rise to a continuous horizon, like the one surrounding the island. The artist’s images respond to the rules of two-dimensionality that govern the canvas, they introduce a discourse which refers to painting in general, pushing its limits so as to enmesh the spectator in a shared illusion. Present in one of the canvases is a mechanism that is often used by Paula: a decorative “painting within a painting” – in this case the drawing of a leopard – the representation of the representation. Unlike Paula, John Kleckner uses mixed media and collage to create his works; he uses surreal and abstract forms by overlapping areas of colour and figurative inserts. Memories of the journey are transfigured into symbols and mixed within two-dimensional compositions, between the real and the artificial, in a never-ending quest for balance. Dense fragments of thoughts, far-removed from the fast pace of today’s communication, the contemplation of these works takes time. Fruit of a meditative practice, they are consolidated in the topographical maps of the possibilities of the imaginary. The twins, Carlo and Fabio Ingrassia, created two site-specific installations that manifest the artists’ lines of aesthetic research. The first installation, created for the central nave in the Chapel, comprises three drawings, small-format pastels on paper, inspired by the images of some of the facades in Noto, Modica and Gibellina, in line with their series entitled Astrazione Novecentista. The second installation, in the hypostyle room, is part of the series entitled I Limiti del Perdono (progetto Velature). The purer timbre of the pigment of an abstract work is triggered via the meticulous stratification of countless layers of crimson colour made in pastel. A monochrome, veiled surface, whose reflection on the ground becomes an installation of dust that expands beyond the edges of the drawing, shrouding the viewer in a reality that becomes performative activity. The viewer, whose shadow is reflected in the design, becomes an image in the painting. Near the Velatura, the visitor is invited to interact with the site-specific work made by Ignazio Mortellaro for the archeological dig in the floor of the hypostyle room. A black mirror at the bottom placed on the floor of the dig and sound create a symbolic “omphalos” (navel), considered by the Ancient Greeks to be the centre where the different levels of life meet, a means of communication between land and sky, inside and outside. The aesthetic themes of reflection and abstraction establish a relationship between the works exhibited in this space (which includes Adrianna Glaviano’s photograph). Hence, the traveller/artist, like in the myth of Narcissus, seeks himself and his own identity in the repetition of the journey, in the encounter with the “other”, and in his own reflection.

Una certa inclinazione di luce di Valentina Bruschi

Il Viaggio in Sicilia si è svolto durante la vendemmia 2014, all’inizio dell’autunno, quando è più mite la luce del sole e inizia l’aratura dei campi. La poesia di Emily Dickinson che dà il nome a questo testo, e da cui è tratto anche il verso quando il paesaggio è in ascolto (titolo della mostra), parla di una luce misteriosa che rende la realtà “altra” da come verrebbe percepita. La poetessa parla di una “ferita celeste” che genera un profondo cambiamento interiore, avvertito da poeti e artisti nomadi alla ricerca d’ispirazione. In Sicilia è ancora possibile fare esperienza diretta di territori intrisi di memoria e natura, tradizioni e miti che fanno riferimento a rituali antichi, ricchi di simboli. Una cultura che custodisce i valori legati alla storia e alla terra e che oggi è finalmente tornata all’attenzione di quanti sono impegnati a restituirle centralità, attraverso il recupero e la valorizzazione di relazioni sostenibili tra Uomo e Natura. La vitivinicoltura in Sicilia, indirizzata alla difesa e tutela del paesaggio agrario, all’ecocompatibilità delle produzioni, prima ancora che alla valorizzazione delle risorse naturali, è stata una delle forze propulsive di questo progetto socio/economico/culturale. L’esperienza del viaggio in Sicilia è stata per gli artisti un attraversare i diversi luoghi dell’isola e anche un’infiltrazione di altrove che si riflette nella capacità dell’arte di sintetizzare situazioni e restituire visioni multiple e diverse. Nella mostra, realizzata nove mesi dopo la residenza nomade - durante la quale si è creata una piccola comunità in cui le diverse anime si sono confrontate tra loro e le realtà circostanti - gli artisti hanno trasposto nelle opere l'esperienza del viaggio.  Adrianna Glaviano e Ignazio Mortellaro hanno realizzato un réportage fotografico sia in pellicola che in digitale, servendosi anche di una vintage Polaroid Land 195, con la quale Adrianna Glaviano ha composto il Visual diary per questa pubblicazione. Nelle istantanee Adrianna Glaviano cattura quel certo fascino che la Polaroid generò nel momento della sua invenzione: un’immagine così piccola da poterla tenere in mano e portare in viaggio e osservare la meraviglia delle forme svilupparsi lentamente sulla sua superficie, destinate nel tempo, inevitabilmente, a sbiadire. Particolari, a volte trascurabili, diventano significativi e il nostro sguardo forse non li avrebbe mai colti nella loro bellezza mentre la fotografa li esalta. Le immagini dai colori tenui diventano poetiche per l’aurea di splendore delicato che rimandano. Soggetti fragili, come nel caso dei fiori secchi, ma in grado di catalizzare luce e spazio. Paula Karoline Kamps ha realizzato dipinti di grandi dimensioni, in cui le memorie del viaggio sono trasfigurate in immagini oniriche, tra astrazione e figurazione: il pattern dei pavimenti barocchi; un corpo fluttuante illuminato da una luna multipla (che crea una distorsione visiva dei piani); un braccio maschile con tatuaggi nei quali i colori più chiari sulla pelle risultano sbiaditi dal tempo. Un colore blu intenso domina lo sfondo di due delle tele realizzate dopo il viaggio in Sicilia, dove cielo e mare si confondono dando origine a un orizzonte continuo, come quello che circonda l’isola. Le immagini dell’artista rispondono alle regole della bidimensionalità della tela, introducono un discorso tutto interno alla pittura, giocando con i limiti di questo mezzo, così da irretire lo spettatore in un’illusione condivisa. In una delle tele è presente un meccanismo utilizzato spesso da Paula: uno spunto decorativo per realizzare un “quadro nel quadro” – in questo caso il disegno di un leopardo - rappresentazione della rappresentazione. Al contrario di Paula, le opere pittoriche di John Kleckner vengono realizzate con tecniche miste e collage, proprio attraverso l’uso di forme surreali e astratte in una sovrapposizione di campiture di colore e inserti figurativi. Ricordi del viaggio sono alterati in simboli e rimescolati tra loro all’interno di composizioni bidimensionali, tra reale e artificiale, in una continua ricerca di equilibrio. Frammenti densi di pensieri, distanti dalla velocità della comunicazione di oggi, questi lavori necessitano di tempo per la loro contemplazione. Frutto di una pratica meditativa, si concretizzano in mappature topografiche delle possibilità dell’immaginario. I gemelli Carlo e Fabio Ingrassia hanno realizzato due installazioni site-specific che manifestano le linee della ricerca estetica degli artisti. La prima installazione, ideata per la navata centrale della Cappella, consiste in tre disegni, a pastello su carta, di piccole dimensioni, per i quali gli artisti hanno preso spunto dalle immagini di alcune facciate di Noto e di Modica, sulla scia con la serie Astrazione Novecentista. La seconda, nella sala ipostila, fa parte della serie I Limiti del Perdono (progetto Velature): attraverso la meticolosa stratificazione di innumerevoli patine di colore porpora disegnate a pastello, scaturisce il timbro più puro del pigmento in un’opera astratta. Una superficie monocroma, velata, il cui riflesso a terra diventa un’installazione di polvere e si espande oltre i limiti del disegno, avvolgendo lo spettatore in una realtà che diventa attività performativa. Lo spettatore, la cui ombra si riflette sul disegno, diventa immagine nel quadro. Accanto alla Velatura, il visitatore è invitato a interagire anche con l’opera site specific realizzata da Ignazio Mortellaro per lo scavo archeologico nel pavimento della sala ipostila: uno specchio nero adagiato sul fondo della cavità e un suono ambientale creano un simbolico “omphalos” (ombelico), luogo centrale per gli antichi greci dove le diverse modalità dell’essere si incontrano, veicolo di comunicazione tra cielo e terra, interno e esterno. Le tematiche estetiche del riflesso e dell’astrazione stabiliscono una relazione tra le opere esposte in questo spazio (tra le quali anche la fotografia di Adrianna Glaviano (pag. XX): così il viaggiatore/artista, come nel mito di Narciso, cerca se stesso e la sua identità nella ripetizione del viaggio, nell’incontro con l’altro e nel proprio riflesso.