•  
SCALZA VARCANDO DA SABBIE LUNARI
CURATED BY
Valentina Bruschi
DATE
opening 2nd February 2017 | 3rd February to 22th March 2017
PLACE
Milan
GALLERY
Francesco Pantaleone arte Contemporanea at Spazio | 22
PHOTO CREDITS
Antonio Maniscalco, Ignazio Mortellaro
CURATED BY
Valentina Bruschi
DATE
opening 2nd February 2017 | 3rd February to 22th March 2017
PLACE
Milan
GALLERY
Francesco Pantaleone arte Contemporanea at Spazio | 22
PHOTO CREDITS
Antonio Maniscalco, Ignazio Mortellaro
Memories of a deep time

essay by Valentina Bruschi

Eco

Scalza varcando da sabbie lunari, / Aurora, amore festoso, d’un’eco / Popoli l’esule universo e lasci / Nella carne dei giorni, / Perenne scia, una piaga velata.

Echo

Barefoot stepping from lunar sands, / Aurora, joyous love, of echoes / You people the empty universe and leave / In the flesh of our days, / Endless wake, a veiled scar.

(Sentimento del Tempo, Giuseppe Ungaretti, 1927)

Whilst planning his second solo exhibition in Milan, Ignazio Mortellaro confronted a particular space –an ex bank vault– looking for interesting associations with the architecture of the space. An underground room, previously a storage of valuables, now transformed by the artist, by analogy, into a cave. A new environment where the public is stimulated to undertake a journey in order to find the traces of a “deep time” of mankind. A short circuit resulted from the radical juxtaposition of distant realities, combined by the metre of Echo (1927, from the collection A Sense of Time), emblematic poem by Giuseppe Ungaretti, where the dawning light is perceived as an absolute daybreak, visual echo of a primordial image. A lyrical approach that, during the last two years, has inspired Ignazio Mortellaro to analyse the Hermeticism of Salvatore Quasimodo and other nineteenth century poets, in search of a general awareness of art as an “epiphany”, a fleeting enlightenment of reality. We can perceive an affinity of the artist with those poets who fought the “historical emptiness” between the two Wars, and the modernity of their research: the urge of a radical contact between Man and the existential root of his being. Ungaretti, in particular, in his American Lessons taught as visiting professor at Columbia University in 1964, refers to an “uncontaminated state of nature” as a sensed dimension, the goal of a trip through a multiple layered universe, always keeping on the threshold, faced by exiles. An ambivalent feeling for the dawn as a “first image”, a light always interwoven with shadows: an expressible, yet elusive, mystery. The dualism and the contrast between light/dark, single/multiple, which is present in the poem by Ungaretti, transforms itself and develops also in the construction of this exhibition, through opposites: sky/earth, hunter/prey, plant/mineral. Paraphrasing Ungaretti’s poem, the show is made up of six original artworks and each single work bears as a title a verse of Echo, starting exactly from the heading of the literary work which gives title to a diptych of brass disks. Emblems of a duality and a rhythm which can be found in the entire layout of the exhibition, the two circles are engraved according to a sound sequence based on a mathematical calculation, nearly a rebus puzzle, in which the solution is suggested by the equilibrium of our moving forwards. The first verse of the lyric, Scalza varcando da sabbie lunari (Barefoot stepping from lunar sands), which gives the title to the exhibition, is instead referred to the work positioned on the ground, a bed composed of sedimented white cement powder, on which the artist has traced a solar eclipse, similar to the one of 1919 which made it possible to observe the deflection of light under the effect of the gravitational attraction of the sun, thus validating the Theory of General Relativity. The eclipse, a recurring theme in Mortellaro’s work, is also to be intended as an exceptional event which happens when the moon crosses the space between the earth and the sun, and their alignment darkens the sky. Concealing the source of the visible, a new condition for our view on the world is achieved and a new landscape is revealed. The eclipse as a metaphor of a different kind of seeing. Aurora, amore festoso d’un’eco (Aurora, joyous love, of echoes) is the wall installation, composed of four Indian drums, on which the artist has traced constellations: Orion, together with his two hound dogs (Canis Major and Canis Minor) and one of his prey, Lepus. These instruments, of ancient human usage, become portions of the celestial sphere, preserving their potential as totem objects. Percussion instruments charged with symbolism, their obvious ritual value is recalled and reinterpreted, at the same time. Their peculiar, hypnotic, profound and obsessive timbre is artificially reconstructed by Roots in Heaven, the electronic musician who collaborates with Mortellaro’s vision, contributing with his sound interpretation of the verse “Popoli l’esule universo e lasci” (You people the empty universe and leave). Through a complex process of electronic synthesis, an ex-novo creation of oscillations of frequencies converted in sound/noise for the human ear, Roots in Heaven creates a soundscape texture on which Mortellaro’s work can display itself coherently. Five double-pointed brass lances are placed against the walls of the gallery, giving the effect of suspension from the ground. The javelins seem to be weapons but also diagonal blades of light. A central darker handle interrupts the brightness of the brass. This is made out of old hydraulics pipes, which were recovered from excavations, oxidised and corroded naturally by atmospheric agents, and they seem to reference a plant material or, even, the leathers which wrapped the lances of ancient warriors. A multiple-interpretation work, Nella carne dei giorni (In the flesh of our days) is also a homage to one of the recurrent forms in the art of Gilberto Zorio –Master of Arte Povera– who uses the javelin, or the canoe or the star, as an archetype and energetic image which references ideas of tension and vitality. It’s the utopian value, still valid today, of the aesthetic researches conducted at the end of 1960s, when some artists - like alchemists – searched to translate the energy within materials. In Ignazio Mortellaro’s research there is no dichotomy between natural materials and products of modern industry. These can be arranged in a balanced relationship resulting in their being connected because they are both “artefacts” of Man, and it is the artist who perceives, governs and finds order within the transformation of matter process. In this sense, another artefact is the site-specific work, whose title ends the poem: Perenne scia, una piaga velata (Endless wake, a veiled scar). The artist has reproduced a tracing on the wall, enlarging the scale, of the well-known figure of the “deer who turns his head”. This is one of the most surprising details from the cave paintings and rock carvings dating back to the Paleolithic, discovered in the 1950s inside the Cala del Genovese cave, on Levanzo island (part of the Egadi archipelago that was, as some academics presume, a natural passage between Africa and Sicily during the last glacial era). A unique carving that fascinates researchers due the talent of the artist who created it thousands of years ago, capable of expressing a great naturalism because of a different relation between Man and Nature. The artist has decided to recreate this image, onto which he overlaps his distinctive geometrical coordinates that compose a mesh on the wall, because the synthetic line of the ancient incision conveys not only the idea of a primordial image, but also a notion of time. The animal is caught in the moment in which it turns his head, on the run. Reproducing this imago, Mortellaro gives it a new narration, a different sense. The grid overlapped on the image recalls the first Moon Mission photographs (which became icons of graphic visual language) and accentuates the symbolic value of the work. The installation becomes the aesthetic manifesto of the artist. He is undoubtedly interested in universal models of knowledge and communication, and how these can be found in primordial language, which is both concise and immediate, referencing the intimate relationship that has always existed between Man and his environment.

Memorie di un tempo profondo

testo di Valentina Bruschi

Eco

Scalza varcando da sabbie lunari, / Aurora, amore festoso, d’un’eco / Popoli l’esule universo e lasci / Nella carne dei giorni, / Perenne scia, una piaga velata.

(Sentimento del Tempo, Giuseppe Ungaretti, 1927)

Nel progettare la sua seconda personale milanese, Ignazio Mortellaro si è confrontato con uno spazio particolare – un ex-caveau – cercando corrispondenze inaspettate con l’architettura del luogo. Un ambiente sotterraneo, un tempo deposito di valori, viene trasformato dall’artista, per analogia, in una caverna. Un nuovo paesaggio dove il pubblico è sollecitato ad intraprendere un viaggio per ritrovare le tracce di un “tempo profondo” dell’umanità. Un corto circuito nato dall’accostamento inedito di realtà distanti, unite dalla metrica di Eco (1927, dalla raccolta Sentimento del Tempo), poesia emblematica di Giuseppe Ungaretti, dove si percepisce la luce aurorale come un’alba assoluta, eco visivo di un’immagine primigenia. Un approccio lirico che, negli ultimi due anni, ha suggerito ad Ignazio Mortellaro di approfondire l’ermetismo di Salvatore Quasimodo e di altri poeti del Novecento, in una ricerca del comune sentire l’arte come “epifania” e fuggevole illuminazione del reale. Si avverte un’affinità dell’artista con quei poeti che hanno combattuto il “vuoto storico”, tra le due Guerre, e con la modernità della loro ricerca: la necessità di una radicale presa di contatto dell’Uomo con la radice esistenziale del suo essere. Ungaretti, in particolare, nelle Lezioni Americane tenute come visiting professor alla Columbia University nel 1964, fa riferimento ad uno “stato incontaminato della natura” come ad una dimensione intuita, la meta di un viaggio in un universo molteplice, affrontato da esuli, sempre restando sulla soglia. Un sentimento ambivalente verso l’alba come “prima immagine”, una luce sempre intrecciata di ombre: un mistero esprimibile ma inafferrabile. Il dualismo e la contrapposizione tra chiaro/scuro, unità/molteplice, presente nella poesia di Ungaretti si trasforma e si sviluppa anche nella costruzione di questa mostra, attraverso i binomi dialettici: cielo/terra, cacciatore/cacciato e vegetale/minerale. Parafrasando la poesia di Ungaretti, il percorso si compone di sei lavori inediti e ogni singola opera ha come titolo una strofa di Eco, iniziando proprio dal titolo del componimento, che dà il nome ad un dittico di dischi in ottone. Emblemi di una dualità e di un ritmo che si riscontra in tutto l’allestimento, i due cerchi sono incisi seguendo una sequenza sonora basata su un gioco matematico, quasi un rebus, in cui la soluzione è suggerita dall’equilibrio del nostro procedere. Il primo verso della lirica, Scalza varcando da sabbie lunari, che dà il titolo alla mostra, si riferisce invece all’opera posizionata a terra, composta da un letto di polvere di cemento bianco, sedimentato, sul quale l’artista traccia un’eclisse solare, come quella del 1919 che ha permesso di osservare la deflessione della luce sotto l’effetto dell’attrazione gravitazionale del Sole, validando così la Teoria della relatività generale. L’eclisse, tema ricorrente nel lavoro di Mortellaro, è inteso anche come evento eccezionale, che si verifica quando la luna attraversa lo spazio tra la terra e il sole, e il loro allineamento oscura il cielo. Con la sorgente del visibile che viene celata, si crea una nuova condizione per il nostro sguardo sul mondo e un nuovo paesaggio viene svelato. L’eclissi come metafora di un diverso tipo di vedere. Aurora, amore festoso d’un’eco è l’installazione a muro, composta da quattro tamburi indiani, sui quali l’artista ha tracciato delle costellazioni: Orione, con i suoi due cani da caccia (Cane Maggiore e Cane Minore) e una delle sue prede, la Lepre. Questi strumenti, di antico uso umano, diventano porzioni della sfera celeste che conservano il loro potenziale di oggetto-feticcio. Tali strumenti a percussione divengono carichi di simbolismo e la loro ovvia valenza rituale viene ricordata e reinterpretata al tempo stesso. Il loro timbro peculiare, ipnotico, profondo e ossessivo, viene ricostruito artificialmente dal produttore di musica elettronica Roots In Heaven, il quale collabora con la visione di Mortellaro contribuendo con la sua interpretazione sonora del verso “Popoli l’esule universo e lasci”. Tramite un labirintico processo di sintesi elettronica, cioè creazione ex-novo di oscillazioni di frequenze che si traducono in suono/rumore per l’orecchio umano, Roots In Heaven crea un tappeto di suoni sul quale il lavoro di Mortellaro può adagiarsi coerentemente. Cinque lance a doppia punta in ottone sono appoggiate alle pareti della galleria, dando l’effetto di essere sospese dal suolo. I giavellotti sembrano delle armi ma anche lame diagonali di luce. Un manico centrale, più scuro, interrompe la luminosità dell’ottone. Sono vecchi tubi d’idraulica, recuperati da scavi, ossidati e corrosi dagli agenti atmosferici e sembrano alludere ad un materiale vegetale, o ancora alle pelli che avvolgevano le lance di antichi guerrieri. Lavoro dalle molteplici letture, Nella carne dei giorni, è anche un omaggio ad una delle forme ricorrenti dell’opera dell’artista Gilberto Zorio – maestro dell’Arte Povera – che utilizza il giavellotto, come la canoa o la stella, in quanto archetipo e immagine energetica che rimanda ad un’idea di tensione e vitalità. E’ il valore utopico ancora attuale delle ricerche estetiche nate alla fine degli anni Sessanta, quando afferma il ruolo dell’artista come alchimista in grado di sprigionare l’energia insita nei materiali. Nella ricerca di Ignazio Mortellaro non c’è dicotomia tra materie naturali e prodotti della modernità industriale, accomunati da un’armonia data dall’essere entrambi uniti e “artefatti” dall’Uomo, perché è l’artista che percepisce, governa e trova un’armonia con il processo di trasformazione della materia. In questo senso è un artefatto anche il lavoro site-specific il cui titolo chiude la poesia: Perenne scia, una piaga velata. L’artista ha riprodotto una traccia, su scala più grande, della celebre figura del “cervo che volge la testa”, uno dei dettagli più sorprendenti delle pitture e incisioni rupestri risalenti al paleolitico, scoperte negli anni Cinquanta nella grotta di Cala del Genovese, sull’isola di Levanzo (parte dell’Arcipelago delle Egadi che, suppongono alcuni studiosi, era un passaggio naturale tra Africa e Sicilia durante l’ultima glaciazione). Un segno unico che affascina i ricercatori per il talento dell’artista che lo ha realizzato migliaia di anni fa, capace di esprimere un grande naturalismo, frutto di un diverso rapporto tra Uomo e Natura. L’artista sceglie di ricreare questa immagine, alla quale sovrappone le sue caratteristiche coordinate geometriche che costruiscono una maglia sulla parete, perché il tratto sintetico dell’incisione antica esprime non solo l’idea di un’immagine primigenia ma anche una nozione tempo. L’animale è colto nel momento in cui gira la testa, in fuga. Riproducendo questa imago, Mortellaro gli conferisce una nuova narrazione, un senso diverso. La griglia sovrapposta all’immagine richiama quella delle prime fotografie delle missioni lunari (divenute icone del linguaggio grafico) e accentua il valore simbolico dell’opera. L’installazione diventa il manifesto estetico dell’artista. E’ chiaro il suo interesse per i modelli universali di cognizione e comunicazione e di come questi si ritrovano nel linguaggio primordiale, astratto e immediato, capace di ricordarci la memoria della relazione intima che è sempre esistita tra noi e il nostro ambiente.